Month: January 2017

Gavin Walker

Capital’s allegories: The transition to capitalism and the national question

Gavin Walker, Department of History, McGill University

Friday.  27.Jan.2016.

3:00-5:00pm.  SS2125.

100 St. George Street

Tea. Coffee. Cookies

ABSTRACT:The transition to capitalism remains one of the most contested issues in historical analysis, in a wide variety of geographical sites and local contexts. Was the transition to capitalist modernity an inevitability of the downfall of feudal property relations in western Europe? Was it rather spurred on by the development of a global mercantilism and expansion of trade? What is the relation between this advent of modernity and the legal personhood of the nation-state as well as economic ‘freedom’ in the form of private property and commodified labour-power? And why, in the end, has the debate on the transition to capitalism always been political in nature? In working through the history of these debates in relation to my recently published book The Sublime Perversion of Capital (Duke, 2016), this paper attempts to think a future for the analysis of the transition in relation to the concept of allegory in the theory of historical time. In so doing, we will also try to see what is at stake in this past for a history of the present.

Intersections: Lectures, etc. Department of Geography and Planning, University of Toronto

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Department of East Asian Studies, Faculty of Arts and Science, University of Toronto

David Harvey

David Harvey – Visualizing Capital

Tuesday, January 17, 3:30-5:30pm – Please register here

George Inatieff Theater – 15 Devonshire Place

This is a free public lecture. Space is limited, and registration for a free ticket is required.

David Harvey is Distinguished Professor of Anthropology and Geography at the Graduate Center of the City University of New York (CUNY), Director of Research at the Center for Place, Culture, and Politics, and the author of numerous acclaimed books, articles and essays, including, most recently, The Ways of the World (Oxford, 2016) and Seventeen Contradictions and the End of Capitalism (Oxford, 2014). Professor Harvey’s legendary and popular lectures on Marx’s Capital are freely available to everyone from his website (www.davidharvey.org).

Followed by a reception:

5:30-7:30pm – Brewhaha Craft Beer Lounge – 39 Prince Arthur Avenue – below Duke of York

Brought to you by Intersections Lecture Series, Department of Geography & Planning, University of Toronto.

 

Marion Werner

Food systems and sovereignty: Exploring geographies of uneven development in the Caribbean

Marion Werner, Department of Geography, SUNY-Buffalo

Friday.  13.Jan.2016.

3:00-5:00pm.  SS2125.

100 St. George Street

Tea. Coffee. Cookies

ABSTRACT: This talk considers broader debates on food sovereignty and uneven development in relation to the Dominican Republic’s food system. The Dominican state remains central to the country’s food production relative to many of its neighbours in the Caribbean, a region associated with extreme exposure to international markets in food and agriculture. The form of the state’s involvement was forged through right-wing land reforms of the late 1960s and early 1970s, which incorporated some 30,000 households into domestic rice production. Today, these “reform sector” farmers, together with their private sector counterparts, meet the country’s entire demand for this staple crop. Rice production is characterized by intensive use of imported agro-chemicals, a largely Haitian migrant workforce, state subsidies to irrigation, a government-funded warehousing and insurance scheme, and, crucially, a protected market. Dominican rice production clearly plays a role in materializing state sovereignty in the context of a regulatory patchwork apparently dominated by international markets and the dictates of multinationals. As the country begins the formal process of liberalization for rice and other sensitive food items under the provisions of a free trade agreement (i.e., DR-CAFTA), the talk offers a basis for the consideration of food sovereignty in the context of uneven regulatory development.

Intersections: Lectures, etc. Department of Geography and Planning, University of Toronto

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Development Seminar Series, Faculty of Arts and Science, University of Toronto